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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- they were used in the dances that we have today. >> (speaking spanish). >> this movement -- >> span spanish. >> are >> >> (speaking spanish). >> are here and it means soul. >> (speaking spanish). >> and when we go to move our bodies -- >> (speaking spanish). >> they mean the essence. >> (speaking spanish). >> when they go to work the earth -- >> (speaking spanish). >> is the contact with our mother nature. >>nature -- >> (speaking spanish). >> that will live us food, take care of us and receive us before we die. >> (speaking spanish). >> we also have this and movement of work. >> (speaking spanish). >> or conversation. >> (speaking spanish). >> which is the key to receive love. >> (speaking spanish). >> and all these type of movements were followed by this style of dance with its own co n coring on gravy. >> >> (speaking spanish) (music). (applause). >> can you play the music please? >> i want to dance with everybody. >> well, he's not there. (music). >> okay do you have any questions? we need to have some minutes and would like to answer some questions. yes? >> (inaudible). >> is it har
found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, n
the establishment of the dual status commander helps us pull title 10 and title 32 forces together in a more synchronized dod response. the new attention and focus by dod is only part of the puzzle, though. dod success in helping in response to a disaster will ultimately be determined by civil authorities and their ability to properly plan their initial response and then the means by which dod capabilities are requested and properly employed. we know dod is in support of civil authorities and the real burden to that effective support is going to be sound planning to ensure we're properly directed and we can best benefit or provide benefit to the need of the place where we're supporting. the guidance now being given will drive training and exercises. and recognition of our effectiveness at providing relief for our fellow citizens does require preparation. vice admiral beeman spoke emphatickly of readiness yesterday. readiness is no accident but is a deliberate outcome of focus and hard work. dod is now stepping up to the plate in a very formal and direct way but this will only w
in the event of a complex catastrophe, so that is a little bit different for us. there has been movement within dod and we have grown and matured certainly our presence in the fema regions has expanded, new capabilities have been delivered to the states, and we have developed the much more responsive and functional command structure, i believe, with the dual status commander and that's somebody who can bridge national guard and active or federalized forces as they flow into a disaster response. but more recently the secretary of defense has elevated this and defense support to civil authorities has been dregted -- directed into the departments to start developing plans and policies that will adjust how we respond. so we're seeing a directive that will make things more expensive and specific in defense for civil authorities and this is the most significant move in dsca that i have seen in my career. since late november, 2011, comprehensive planning meetings have taken place to analyze the issues surrounding dsca and have provided a laundry list for recommendations of actions to be taken. the d
be a good idea for us to hear about the operations that the chilean navy had undertaken for helping out their citizens. we have a panel here today, we actually have two panels we're going to roll through. one is stories from the field, if you will, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in th
believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've known melvin for a number of years, obviously we served together in the marine corps. i can tell you he's been with fleet week for 3 years now and the one thing about mel, he's got a lot of ideas and he accepts no as an interim answer because a lot of things that he wanted to do to make fleet week better originally the answer from authorities was no. and he made some amazing things happen just through his will. a commander can will things to happen. and i really want to thank you, mel, for that whole peer to peer medical exchange was your idea and it was just a huge hit and i thank you so much for that. he's offe
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)